Explore Arizona with the Arizonan

Arizona is a lot more than Phoenix and the Valley. It is a complex and diverse landscape of mountains and deserts, ranches, and farms. Arizona is public lands, Indian lands, military complexes, and forgotten ghost towns. 

Let us help you explore Arizona. Get comfortable, there is a lot to see and learn.

 

Carl Chapman, REALTOR

West USA Realty

Dec. 4, 2020

Pima

Pima is on the Gila River in north-central Graham County. It

was founded in 1879 by Mormon settlers seeking an attractive

canal site in the Gila Valley. In addition to locating a canal line, the

colonists laid out a town site and named it Smithville for Mormon

leader Jesse Smith.

 

The Gila River was one of the main waterways followed by

American fur trappers and mountain men in their search for pelts in

the 1820s and 1830s. The lands aside the river served as the Gila

Trail along which General Stephen W. Kearny brought a part of his

“Army of the West” in 1846. The town, at an elevation of 2,885

feet, originally was in Pima County, and when it got a post office in

1880, the name was changed to Pima after the Indian tribe of that

name.

 

Incorporated in 1884, Pima is approximately 134 miles from Tucson

and 160 miles from Phoenix. From Tucson, the route to Pima is east

on Interstate 10 to U.S. 191, turning north to Safford, then north-west

on U.S. 70. From Phoenix, Pima is reached via U.S. 60 to

Globe, then U.S. 70.

 

Agriculture is the predominant economic activity in Graham County,

with much of it centered in the Pima-Thatcher-Safford area. Pima

historically has been an agricultural center, with irrigation water

coming from the Gila River. Principal crops are cotton, alfalfa and

grains. Cattle and beef are important, too. As a farm trade center,

Pima serves surrounding agricultural areas and other portions of

eastern Arizona.

 

Pima is also becoming a popular retirement community. Partly due

to an increase in tourism and winter visitors, wholesale and retail

trade and services comprise a fourth of the county's employment.

But government, with 37 percent of the total, is the largest employer

in the county. This covers employment by county, state and federal

offices, as well as by the community college in Thatcher.

 

Pima is approximately 15 miles north of a portion of the Coronado

National Forest, which provides numerous recreational facilities.

Two of the most popular areas are the Pinaleno Mountains and

10,720-foot Mount Graham. Swift Trail, a 36-mile tour (one of the

many scenic drives in the area), provides a route to the summit of

Mount Graham and features many picnic and camping sites.

Forty-nine miles away is the ranger station at Columbine and Riggs

Lake, which has facilities for fishing, boating and other water-oriented

activities. U.S. 70 connects Pima to the recreation areas at

San Carlos Lake and Coolidge Dam, as well as other attractions

such as Cluff Ranch, the frontier fortifications of Fort Thomas and

Geronimo, and the historic cattle-shipping point of Calva.

 

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

Pimeria Alta Historical Society Museum

The Pimeria Alta Historical Society Museum building was built in 1914.  Since then it has had several purposes such as a police department, fire department and city hall.  Today it houses the history of southern Arizona and includes the northern part of the Mexican state of Sonora.  The museum begins with the Hohokam Indians, who began living in the area long ago and ends with the modern border city as it is today.

Visitors will see a variety of items from the building’s past.  A horse-drawn water pumper and an old jail cell are just some of things that you come across during your visit.  Indian artifacts and early settler’s tools and household items are shown to recount the area’s history.  One interesting exhibit is the photo display of historic Nogales from the 1800s.

The Pimeria Alta Historical Society Museum is open Friday through Sunday.  The hours for each day changes:, Friday 10:00 to 5:00 pm, Saturday 10:00 to 4:00 pm and Sunday 1:00 to 4:00 pm.  The research library has its own hours and days.  The library is open Monday through Sunday.  The hours also vary depending on the day: Monday through Friday 9:00 to 5:00 pm, Saturday 10:00 to 4:00 pm and Sunday 1:00 to 4:00 pm.  The admission charge to the museum is free.

The Pimeria Alta Historical Society Museum is located at the old city hall building, at 136 North Grand Avenue.  You will find the museum at the corner of Grand Avenue and Crawford Street.  It is approximately one-fourth of a mile from the border.   I would recommend giving the museum a call before you visit to double-check on the days and times, the number is 520-287-4621. 

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

Pinal County

Pinal County was formed from portions of Maricopa and Pima counties on Feb. 1, 1875, in response to the petition of residents of the upper Gila River Valley, as "Act #1" of the Eighth Territorial Legislature. Florence, established in 1866, was designated and has remained the county seat. The county encompasses 5,371square miles, of which 30 are water. In both the economy and geography, Pinal County has two distinct regions. The eastern portion is characterized by mountains, elevations to 6,000 feet and copper mining. The western area is primarily low desert valleys and irrigated agriculture. The communities of Mammoth, Oracle, San Manuel, and Kearny are active in copper mining, smelting, milling and refining. Arizona City, Eloy, Maricopa, Picacho, Red Rock and Stanfield have agricultural based-economies. Apache Junction, Arizona City, Coolidge, Eloy, and particularly Casa Grande have diversified their economic base to include manufacturing, trade and services. This expansion and diversification has been facilitated by their location in the major growth corridor between Phoenix and Tucson near the junction of I-10 and I-8, except for Apache Junction, which is to the east of burgeoning Mesa. All of Pinal County is an Enterprise Zone. The county is home to many interesting attractions, including the Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Picacho Peak State Park, Picacho Reservoir, Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum, Oracle State Park and the Biosphere, McFarland State Park, Lost Dutchman State Park, Skydive Arizona, the world’s largest skydiving drop-zone, and the Florence Historical District, with 120 buildings on the National Register. The state of Arizona is the county’s largest landholder with 35.3 percent, followed by individuals and corporations, 25.7 percent; Indian reservations, 20.3 percent; the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management, 17.5 percent, and the remaining 1.2 percent is other public land.

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

Pipe Spring National Monument

Pipe Spring National Monument is an oasis in the desert. With four springs in the immediate area and what used to be rich grasslands, this area has long been inhabited. Ancestral Puebloans and Paiute Indians were the first people drawn here by the water. Later, Mormon settlers, attracted by the water and grasslands-- said to have grown "belly high to a horse"-- called Pipe Spring home and established a ranching operation. In 1923, Pipe Spring was set aside as a National Monument to preserve this rich history. 

Today, visitors can tour the remains of this Mormon cattle ranch established in the late nineteenth century. A fully furnished historic fort, Winsor Castle, allows visitors to step back in time and relive Mormon pioneer life. 

VISITATION:

55,000 visitors annually. Fall, winter, and spring are periods of lower visitation. These periods offer excellent opportunities for birding. Because summer months bring the greatest number of visitors, most deomonstrationa, walks, and talks are scheduled for that period.

 Visitors to this page since 10/9/98. 

LOCATION:

Located on the Arizona Strip. The Arizona Strip is a 12,000 square mile area in northern Arizona, north of the Grand Canyon and south of the Utah border. 

ADDRESS:

Pipe Spring National Monument

HC 65 Box 5

Fredonia, Arizona 86022

TELEPHONE:

(520) 643-7105

OPERATING HOURS, SEASONS:

NOTE: Pipe Spring National Monument is on Mountain Standard Time all year.

Winter (October through May)

Monument and visitor center open 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Winsor Castle tours 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on the hour and the half hour.

Summer (May through September)

Monument and visitor center open 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Winsor Castle tours 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., on the hour and the half hour.

Closed Christmas Day, Thanksgiving and New Year's Day.

CLIMATE, RECOMMENDED CLOTHING:

Winter: daytime highs around 40° F (4° C), and night time lows near 20° F (-7° C). Occasional snow. 

Summer: daytime highs around 95° F (35° C) and night time lows near 60° F (16° C). Summer afternoons often bring sudden thundershowers so an umbrella or rain wear could be useful. 

DIRECTIONS:

Pipe Spring is 14 miles (23km) west of Fredonia, AZ, and 21 miles (34 km) southwest of Kanab, UT. From either, follow US 89A to AZ 389. 

Pipe Spring is 44 miles (72 km) east of Hurricane, UT, where UT9 and UT 17 connect with UT 59. From Hurricane, follow UT59 to AZ 389. 

Pipe Spring is 181 miles (291 km) east of Las Vegas, NV. Follow I-15 to UT 9 to UT 59 to AZ 389. 

The nearest airport is in St. George, Utah, 52 miles (84km). 

FEES, COST, RATES:

Monument entrance fee is $2.00 per person for visitors 17 and older. Visitors 16 and under are admitted free. Golden Eagle, Golden Age and Golden Access Passports are accepted. At Pipe Spring National Monument, a walk-in rather than drive-in park, these passes cover only the card holder and his/her immediate family. 

FACILITIES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Visitor Center/Exhibits:

The Visitor Center offers exhibits on pioneer lifestyle, the development and use of Pipe Spring by American Indian groups and Mormon settlers, and a short video providing an overview of the history of the area. Vehicles must park in the lot at the Visitor Center. 

Trails, Roads:

Pipe Spring is a walk-in park. From the visitor center, located near the parking lot, to the historic buildings is a 125 yard walk.

In addition, there is a ½ mile loop trail offering impressive views of the Arizona Strip, Mt. Trumbull, the Kaibab plateau, and Kanab Creek Canyon. 

Programs/Activities:

Pipe Spring has three historic buildings open to the public year round. Winsor Castle (the Fort) is accessible only by ranger guided tour. These tours are offered every half hour on the hour and the half hour. The East and West Cabins can be visited by self guided tour. 

Monument grounds include a garden, orchard, longhorn cattle corral (complete with longhorns), horse corral, other farm livestock and a ½ mile loop trail offering impressive views of the Arizona Strip. These can be visited by self guided tour. 

During the summer months, ranger guided walks, talks and demonstrations of pioneer lifestyle are offered daily in the cooler morning hours. 

Lodging and camping facilities:

Camping, with full RV hookups and showers, is available ¼ mile north of the Monument at a campground on the Kaibab Paiute Reservation. Contact the Tribal Offices for more information at (520) 643-7245. Lodging is available in Fredonia, AZ (14 miles, 23 km) and Kanab, UT (21 miles, 34 km) 

Food/supplies:

Food service at the Monument is available at a café operated by the Kaibab Paiute Tribe. Food and gas are available at a gas station/convenience store, operated by the Kaibab Paiute Tribe, ½ mile from the Monument, just off AZ 389. Additional food services and grocery stores are available in Fredonia and Kanab. 

Other Concessions/NPS-Managed Visitor Facilities and Opportunities:

Zion Natural History Association operates a bookstore and gift shop featuring books on American Indian and pioneer history and American Indian and pioneer crafts. 

Under an agreement with Grand Canyon National Park, Pipe Spring can issue last minute back - country permits to a limited number of sites/trails for the North Rim of the Grand Canyon only. Success in obtaining a permit is dependent upon available campsite space. Fees are charged for Grand Canyon back-country permits. 

Accessibility:

The Visitor Center and gift shop are accessible to wheelchairs. An accessible restroom is located near the Visitor Center. Paved sidewalks lead to all the historic structures and the orchard. Interiors of the historic structures are not wheelchair accessible. 

The Visitor Center is located 100 yards from the historic structures. All visitors must park their vehicles in the parking lot at the Visitor Center. 

Pets must be leashed while on Monument grounds. 

RESERVATIONS/PERMITS:

Tour and school group reservations can be made by calling (520) 643-7105 at least two weeks prior to the date of intended visit to Pipe Spring. 

BASIC VISIT RECOMMENDATIONS:

Allow at least one hour to visit Pipe Spring National Monument leaving ½ hour for the Fort tour and ½ hour to tour the grounds. If you choose to hike the ½ mile loop trail or attend a ranger guided walk, talk or demonstration (summer months only), allow another half hour for your visit. 

Be aware that Monument livestock can be found freely wandering grounds. These animals are for viewing only. They are not tame, so please use caution and keep a safe distance to ensure your safety. Be aware that there are rattlesnakes and other desert wildlife in the area. Use caution and common sense to guarantee your safety. 

SPECIAL EVENTS:

Pipe Spring National Monument celebrates National Parks Week at the end of April. August 25, the birthday of the National Park Service, is a free admission day. 

VISITOR IMPACTS:

To preserve the historic fort and its period furnishings, tour size is limited to 15 people. 

ADJACENT VISITOR ATTRACTIONS:

Pipe Spring National Monument is close to several other national parks and monuments.

In Utah:

Zion National Park: 63 miles (101 km)

Cedar Breaks National Monument: 88 miles (141 km)

Bryce Canyon National Park: 98 miles (158 km)

In Arizona:

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area: 97 miles (156 km)

Grand Canyon National Park -North Rim: 85 miles (137 km)

 

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

Parker

Water Ski ParkerParker is on the east bank of the Colorado River, 163 miles

west of Phoenix. The Parker “vicinity” consists of a number of separate

but interrelated areas. There is the town of Parker, Parker

South, the Arizona side of the Colorado river area, and the communities

on the California side. Established in 1871, the town was

moved some four miles north to the site of the Atchison, Topeka

and Santa Fe Railroad crossing. At an elevation of 450 feet above

sea level, Parker was founded in 1908 and incorporated in 1948. In

May 1982, by initiative petition, voters formed La Paz County from

the northern portion of the former Yuma County. On Jan. 1, 1983,

Parker became the county seat for La Paz county.

 

Parker's economy is based primarily on retail trade and services.

The 16-mile strip of the Colorado River, between Parker Dam and

Headgate Rock Dam, forms one of the finest bodies of water in the

country for water-based recreational activities. This makes Parker a

major destination point for tourists and winter visitors who take

advantage of local motels, campgrounds, an 18-hole golf course,

mobile homes, RV parks, restaurants, gasoline stations and convenience

markets. Parker also serves as the trade and business center

for the Colorado River Indian Reservation and small towns along

the Colorado River.

 

Agriculture, historically the major economic base of Parker,

continues to contribute to the local economy. The fertile fields of

the Colorado River Indian Reservation yield melons, lettuce, cotton,

wheat, barley and alfalfa.

 

The Colorado River and its lakes offer visitors a variety of water

recreation activities like speed boat racing, water skiing, personal

Watercraft, swimming and tubing. There is also excellent fishing

for bass, crappie, bluegill, catfish, trout, and frogging during season.

Parker Dam, the deepest dam in the world, has self-guided

tours daily.

 

There are two state parks and one county park in the Parker

area. Buckskin State Park, 11 miles north of Parker, has acres of

green grass and shade trees. River Island State Park has 26 campsites,

day-use areas and boat launches. La Paz County Park, eight

miles north of Parker, has campgrounds, showers, a launching

ramp, a baseball diamond, tennis courts, and 1,000 feet of waterfront,

hook-ups and dump station. Nearly 30 additional RV parks

and campgrounds offer visitors a variety of amenities and activities.

For the non-water enthusiasts, the surrounding desert is suitable for

off-road vehicles and rockhounding.

 

A museum with an extensive collection of locally crafted Indian

artifacts, including Chemehuevi basketry, Mojave pottery, Indian

beads and jewelry is operated by the Colorado Indian Tribes.

 

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

OVERLAND ROAD

The US Army blazed this route in the summer of 1863. It connected the Beale Road with the growing community of Prescott, which experienced a short-lived gold rush. This road left the Beale Road near where Flagstaff is today, and continued west through Garland Prairie to Lockett Spring. Then, it turned southwest to cross Hell Canyon and from there south to Prescott. About 30 miles of the route is located on the Kaibab National Forest. The road was used by the military, immigrants, and freighters between 1863 and 1882 when the railroad was built across northern Arizona. As with the Beale Road, much of the Overland Road has been covered over by the present-day Forest Service road system, but portions are still visible.

Location: This historic route is located south of and roughly parallel to Interstate 40.

Access: There are several trailheads where the Overland Road hiking and the equestrian trail is accessible (use of a Forest Service map is advised). Access points include FR 109 at the Pomeroy Tanks area, FR 139 off the County Rd 73, and at Dow Spring, which has turn-of-the-century cabins and logging railroad remains. This route has been marked across the Kaibab National Forest with closely-spaced rock cairns, distinctive brass caps, tree blazes, and 4" wood posts. Interpretive signs with information about the history of the Overland Road can be found at the trailheads. Most of these roads are suitable for passenger vehicles. Travel by motorized vehicle is prohibited on sections of the Overland Road located off of Forest Service roads.

Road Conditions: About 25 miles of paved, cinder and gravel-surfaced roads intersect the Overland Road. Most of these roads are suitable for passenger vehicles. A high clearance vehicle is recommended for FR 57, FR 139, and FR 354.

Overland Road Historic Trail  

This route was laid out and built in the summer of 1863 by the Army. It connected the Beale Road with the growing community of Prescott, which experienced a short-lived gold rush. This road left the Beale Road near where Flagstaff is today, and continued west through Garland Prairie to Lockett Spring. Then, it turned southwest to cross Hell Canyon and from there south to Prescott. About 30 miles of the route is located on the Kaibab National Forest. The road was used by the military, immigrants, and freighters between 1863 and 1882, when the railroad was built across northern Arizona. As with the Beale Road, much of the Overland Road has been covered over by the present-day Forest Service road system, but portions are still visible.

Traveling from east to west, one first encounters the wide grasslands of Garland Prairie. Dotted with hardscrabble homesteads, both active and deserted, its vistas still inspire visions of hardy pioneers. Farther along, the old road enters the trees and passes the remains of an old way-station which even boasted its own post office for a time. The foundations of a few cabins are still visible here.

The markers that blaze the trail then wind on through the forest, past remains of a narrow gauge railroad bed and an abandoned logging camp, past scenic Pomeroy Tanks and historic Whiting Ranch. Along the way, you'll see evidence of a Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps camp and the course of the Bear Springs Sheep Driveway that tens of thousands of animals once traveled over the edge of the rugged Mogollon Rim.

Mountain biking is good on FR 57 between FR 354 and Bear Springs. Horseback riding is recommended anywhere along the trail between FR 141 and FR 139, although it may become rocky in the Pomeroy Tanks area.

Trail Layout: The Forest Service has developed the Overland Road into a recreational trail. The route makes use of forest roads and trails which have been marked with rock cairns, brass cap markers, tree blazes, and 4" by 4" wood posts. A treadway has not been cleared on the trail sections, so it can be a challenge to follow. Trailheads with interpretive signs are provided. The trail sections are open only to hikers and horseback riders. Portions of the historic route that are part of the forest road system may be accessed by any means, including motor vehicles and mountain bicycles.

Length: 25 miles

Hiking Time: A variety of access points provide for hikes of varying length and time.

Rating: Easy to moderate.

Trailhead Location: There are a variety of trailheads (please see forest recreation map for details). An accessible vault toilet is available at Pomeroy Tanks Trailhead.

Recommended Season: Late spring, late fall.

Use Restrictions: Travel by motorized vehicles on sections of the Overland Road located off of Forest Service roads, is prohibited.

Access: There are several trailheads which provide access to the Overland Road hiking and equestrian trail. Interpretive signs with information about the history of the Overland Road can be found at the trailheads. This route has been marked across the Kaibab National Forest with closely-spaced rock cairns, distinctive brass caps, tree blazes, and 4" wood posts. Most of these roads are suitable for passenger vehicles.

Travel Time: 20 minutes to an hour from Williams depending on particular access point.

Road Condition: This historic route is south of and roughly parallel to Interstate 40. About 25 miles of paved, cinder and gravel surfaced roads intersect the Overland Road. Most of these roads are suitable for passenger vehicles. A high clearance vehicle is recommended for FR 57, FR 747, FR 14, FR 139, and FR 354.

USGS Map: Bill Williams Mtn. SW, Bill Williams Mtn. NE, Garland Prairie. (Forest map may also be useful; may be purchased at the Visitors Center.)

 

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

Jerome

 

Jerome is in Northern Arizona.  It is in Yavapai County.  It is located overlooking Verde Valley in the Mingus Mountains on top of Cleopatra Hill in the Prescott National Forest.  You can get there from Phoenix or Tucson by taking Interstate 17 north out of town.  Continue up to the town of Camp Verde where you will exit and head west on State Highway 260.  Then travel along on State Highway 260 to Cottonwood.  Once you cross State Highway 89A, take State Highway 89A west and follow it up to Jerome.  If you are coming from Flagstaff take State Highway 89A southwest out of town and travel through Oak Creek Canyon, Sedona and on up into Jerome.

 

Overview:

Jerome is a unique town to learn about mining and to take in its small town charm.  It is a town that began as a mining town.  Today Jerome’s population is 400.  The town sits at an elevation of 5,435 feet.  It has a moderate climate.  The low temperature in the winter is 30 degrees and the high temperature in the summer is 97 degrees.  Jerome is an interesting town, in that it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1967.  Its homes and streets cling precariously to the sides of Mingus Mountain.  You will find picturesque vistas, which attract both artists and photographers.  The town became deserted after the mining stopped, but today it is making a comeback with tourism.  Antique, craft and gift shops line the streets.  There are also art galleries and boutiques. 

 

Community Features:

There are some terrific attractions near Jerome.  The Jerome State Historic Park is a great place to stop and sample what life was life for the famous copper baron, James Douglas.  The Jerome Historical Society Mine Museum has a photo collection worth stopping in to take a look.  The Gold King Mine and Ghost Town is a quaint place to browse through antique machinery.  The kids will love the petting zoo.  The Verde Canyon Railroad is a wonderful experience.  Visitors will travel down the railroad lines viewing scenic spots and wildlife.  This is a very popular attraction.  Tuzigoot National Monument is an old Indian dwelling.  This national monument gives visitors an opportunity to see the ancient culture up close through several hiking trails.

Jerome has so many outdoor activities.  Dead Horse Ranch State Park is so close to town.  This park has a variety of things to offer its visitors.  You may go camping, horseback riding or even fishing.  The Sycamore Canyon Wilderness Area is a 26-mile canyon perfect for hiking.  This canyon is one of the most breathtaking spots in the area.   

 

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

Cottonwood

Cottonwood is in Northern Arizona.  It is in Yavapai County.  Cottonwood is in the center of the Verde Valley.  The Verde River flows through the town.  The town is bordered on the south, east and west by high mountains and on the north by mesas and buttes.  The town is located on State Highway 89A between Prescott and Sedona.  You can get to Cottonwood from Phoenix or Tucson by taking Interstate 10 north out of town.  When you reach the town of Camp Verde take exit 287.  Then take State Highway 260, west out of Camp Verde.  You will end up at Cottonwood.  It is were State Highway 260 and State Highway 89A meet.  The town is approximately 100 miles from Phoenix.  If you are coming from Flagstaff, take 89A northwest out of town.  Follow the highway through Sedona and on into Cottonwood.  Cottonwood is approximately 50 miles from Flagstaff.

 

Overview:

Cottonwood is an ideal place to base your travels to terrific attractions and outdoor spots.  It is a small town that began as a farming town.  Today Cottonwood has a population of 5,900.  The town sits at an elevation of 3,314 feet.  The climate is mild all year round.  The low temperature in the winter is 30 degrees and the high temperature in the summer is 97 degrees.  Cottonwood receives approximately 11 inches of rain a year and 4 inches of snow.  Cottonwood is a trading center for the Verde Valley.  There are numerous services and manufacturing facilities in town, along with a quaint Historic Old Town area.  It is a pleasant, quiet little community serving a rich agricultural, livestock and mining district.

 

Community Features:

There are some terrific attractions near Cottonwood.  The Verde Canyon Railroad is a wonderful experience.  Visitors will travel down the railroad lines viewing scenic spots and wildlife.  This is a very popular attraction.  Tuzigoot National Monument is an old Indian dwelling.  There are two hiking trails that give visitors an up close look at the culture from long ago.  The Clemenceau Heritage Museum is a neat place to visit to see a room of working model trains and to discover more about the Verde Valley’s past.

Cottonwood has so many outdoor activities.  Dead Horse Ranch State Park is so close to town.  This park has a variety of things to offer its visitors.  The park has camping, picnicking, fishing and horseback riding.  The Sycamore Canyon Wilderness Area is a 26-mile canyon perfect for hiking.  This canyon is one of the most breathtaking spots in the area.   

 

 

Events:

Old Time Fiddlers’ Association Campout and Steak Fry            March

520-7963

Annual Gem and Mineral Show

520-634-7715

Verde Mingus Blow-out 10K run                                                     April

520-639-3200

Annual Antique Auto, Cycle and Aeroplane Show                       May

520-634-7593

Cinco de Mayo Sizzlin’ Salsa Sunday                           

520-634-9468

Verde Valley Fair                               

520-634-3290

Fiesta de Mayo Softball Classic

520-639-3200

Fourth of July Celebration                                                                 July

520-634-3290

 

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

Clarkdale Arizona

Clarkdale is in Northern Arizona.  It is in Yavapai County.  The town is located in the Verde Valley between the towns of Cottonwood and Jerome.  It is on State Highway 260.  You can get there from Phoenix and Tucson by taking Interstate 17 north out of town.  Continue up to the town of Camp Verde, where you will exit and head west on State Highway 260.  Then travel along on State Highway 260 through Cottonwood and into Clarkdale.  If you are coming from Flagstaff take State Highway 89A southwest out of town and travel through Oak Creek Canyon, Sedona and into Cottonwood.  Once in Cottonwood take State Highway 260 northwest to Clarkdale.

 

 

Overview:

Clarkdale is a great place to learn about the history of mining and ride the rails.  It is a small town that began as smelter town.  Today Clarkdale is a model town with beautiful homes and streets.  It has a population of 2,100.  The town sits at an elevation of 3,545 feet.  The climate is cool all year.  The low temperature in the winter is 30 degrees and the high temperature in the summer is 97 degrees.  The town does receive approximately 11 inches of rain a year and 4 inches of snow.  The town has refused to accept the end of the copper era as a defeat.  Today, the town has diversified its economy and adjusted to new realities.  It is building a promising future.  The town is relying on tourism, retirees and trade.

 

Community Features:

There are some terrific attractions in and near Clarkdale.  The Verde Canyon Railroad is a wonderful experience.  Visitors will travel down the railroad lines viewing scenic spots and wildlife.  This is a very popular attraction.  Tuzigoot National Monument is an old Indian dwelling. The monument has hiking trails leading visitors up to the dwellings. 

Clarkdale has so many outdoor activities.  Dead Horse Ranch State Park is so close to town.  This park has a variety of things to offer its visitors.  You will discover camping, horseback riding and fishing.  The Sycamore Canyon Wilderness Area is a 26-mile canyon perfect for hiking.  This canyon is one of the most breathtaking spots in the area.   

 

Posted in Explore Arizona
Dec. 4, 2020

Payson

Payson is in Eastern Arizona.  It is in Gila County.  The town is located below the Mogollon Rim making it a cool and comfortable retreat.  Surrounding Payson is the Tonto National Forest, which holds the largest stand of Ponderosa pine in the world.  The town is located on State Highway 87, at the junction of State Highway 260. 

 

Overview:

Payson is the geographical center of Arizona and is a great place to start your adventures along the Mogollon Rim.  It is one of the oldest communities in the state and has grown to become a very popular mountain cabin retreat area.  Today Payson’s population is 24,500.  The town sits at an elevation of 5,000 feet.  The climate is cool and mild all year round with the winter low temperature of 23 degrees and summer high temperature of 92 degrees.  The town does receive 10 inches of snow a year and 15 inches of rain.  Payson is known for its numerous festivals and events held year round from rodeos to a fiddlers contest to a logging competition.  It is a mountain community where visitors will find every kind of outdoor activity including hunting, fishing, camping and hiking.

 

Community Features:

There are many attractions you won’t want to miss during a visit to Payson.  The Museum of the Forest must be your first stop when arriving in town.  The museum has lots of information on Payson’s history, with its focus being on what life was like as a forest ranger in the early years.  The museum has artifacts, displays and historic buildings, all of which make the museum an interesting stop.  The Strawberry Schoolhouse is just north of Payson, in the town of Strawberry.  This schoolhouse is the oldest one in Arizona, built in 1885.  It has been restored and is full of unique pieces revealing what education was like long ago.  The Shoofly Indian Archaeological Site is just minutes from town.  This site once held more than 80 rooms built of wood, stone and adobe.  The interpretive trail gives visitors an opportunity to learn more about the village.  The Payson Exotic Zoo is a small zoo filled with special animals.  Many of the animals living here have been in movies.  They are trained wild animals and are accustomed to human contact.  It is one zoo you will want to visit.  Mazatzal Casino is located just south of Payson.  This is where gaming fun can be found.  The casino has over 300 slot machines, bingo, keno and a card room.  Mazatzal Casino is known for a “Hot Time in the Cool Pines”.

Since Payson is set in the middle of the forest where there are numerous outdoor activities available to visitors.  The Tonto Natural Bridge State Park is a spectacular sight.  The park has picnic areas, a historic lodge and hiking trails down to the 400-foot natural travertine tunnel.  It is a natural wonder that must be one of your top places to see.  Fishing is a very popular outdoor activity.  If you would like to learn more about these fine fin friends, then you will need to head out to the Tonto Fish Hatchery.  Here you will see brown, brook and rainbow trout growing to maturity.  The interpretive walk is full of fish facts.  The Fossil Springs Wilderness Area is just a short drive north of town, near Strawberry.  The 12,000-acre wilderness area has pools of water along the creek, which are ideal for taking a cool dip.  There are also hiking trails throughout the wilderness area.  If camping is your thing, then a visit to Woods Canyon Lake is the place for you.  The lake offers two campgrounds, a store and hiking trails.  It is the perfect mountain getaway.

 

Events:

Spring Pro Rodeo                                                May

June Bug Blues Festival                                     June

Loggers and Sawdust Festival                           July

World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo                  August

State Championship Fiddlers Contest             September

 

Posted in Explore Arizona