Sycamore Canyon Wilderness Area
The Sycamore Canyon Wilderness Area covers 55,937 acres and is the second largest canyon in Arizona. It is a deep a 26-mile canyon sculpted out of sandstone. The canyon stretches from the pine tree rim up by Williams at an elevation of 6,500 feet down to the desert canyon by the Verde Valley at an elevation of 3,600 feet. Sycamore Creek runs at the bottom of the canyon. The winding creek is surrounded by tree-filled side canyons and wildlife. The canyon runs parallel with Oak Creek Canyon, which is just to the east of it. Three national forests make up the wilderness area, the Coconino, Kaibab, and the Prescott.

This canyon is one of the most breathtaking spots in the area. Visitors have a variety of things to choose from when making their visit. Hiking, horseback riding, climbing, swimming, fishing, and sightseeing are just some of the activities in the Sycamore Canyon. There are old cabins, Indian ruins, and wildlife to view.

The canyon is a designated wilderness area, which means no wheeled or motorized vehicles are allowed. Sycamore Canyon was the first area to be designated and protected under the 1964 Wilderness Act. Sycamore Canyon Wilderness Area is a secluded spot. Sycamore Canyon Wilderness is a one of a kind place, it is important that make sure you leave this spot, just as you saw it.

It is an ideal for enjoying the sights. You can view this canyon from the northern point of the canyon, by leaving Williams on County Road 173 or Fourth Street. Continue on 173 until you come to the turn off for County Road 110. You will follow this road down to the Sycamore Point Overlook. This is a perfect spot to see the canyon if hiking is not your thing. The Sycamore Canyon Point is a scenic view from the top of the canyon down to the Verde Valley.
If you would like to hike into the wilderness area, there are seven trails available. If you decide to take one of these hikes make sure you are prepared. Bring water because it is limited, especially in the lower areas of the canyon. A simple day of hiking should include a forest service trail map, canteen, and appropriate clothes.

One popular hike is the Sycamore Rim Trail. This trail was first proposed in 1975, to provide access to the area so people could enjoy it without impacting its scenic values. The trail forms an 11-mile loop that overlooks the upper portion of the Sycamore Canyon with access at several points along it. The original route was marked and cleared in 1979. Since then the loop has been improved with trail markers throughout. The trail also takes hikers by Sycamore Falls. There are steep and rocky areas along the trail. It is important to come prepared.

You can get to Sycamore Rim Trail from Williams by taking Garland Prairie southwest to Forest Road 141. Take Forest Road south for approximately 12 miles. Then turn right and head southeast onto Forest Road 56 for about one and a half miles. This will take you to the trail parking lot. It is about a 30-minute drive from Williams to the parking lot. The road to the parking area is gravel.
If you would like more information or maps on Sycamore Canyon, you may call 520-635-4061.

Kaibab Lake
Kaibab Lake is a very popular outdoor site. The lake’s location makes it a perfect spot to use as a starting point for trips in the area. The Grand Canyon is only 60 miles away and Williams is just 4 miles from Kaibab Lake.
Visitors will find 70 campsites with fire rings and picnic tables. Two campsites are handicapped accessible. There is a 14-day stay limit. A fee is charged per night. Tents, trailers and small motor homes are welcome. There are pit toilets, garbage bins, a free dump station and water available at the campground. However, fresh water is not available during the winter. There are no utility hook ups.

Kaibab Lake Campground offers its visitors a unique look at nature. The campground hosts offer evening interpretive programs at the campground amphitheater.
Boating and fishing are just some of the favorite activities at Kaibab Lake. A barrier-free pier is ideal for fishing. The lake is stocked with rainbow trout, brown trout, brook trout and channel catfish. A fishing license is required for those over 14 years of age. The cinder boat launch is available for boaters. The lake is limited to single electric motors or single gasoline engines of 8 horsepower or less. There is no swimming in the lake.

You can get to Kaibab Lake from Williams by taking the 165 exit off of Interstate 40. Then take State Highway 64 north for approximately two miles. Here you will see the entrance for the campground on the west side of the road. Follow the paved road to Kaibab Lake. If you are coming from Phoenix or Tucson, take Interstate 17 north out of town to Flagstaff. Then take Interstate 40 west out of Flagstaff to Williams. You will then take the 165 exit off of Interstate 40. Then take State Highway 64 north for approximately two miles. Here you will see the entrance for the campground on the west side of the road. Follow the paved road to Kaibab Lake.
If you would like more information on this lake, you may call 520-635-4061.

Grand Canyon Deer Farm
The Grand Canyon Deer Farm has been in operation since 1969. The name Deer Farm conjures up images of pens filled with deer, but this not the case. Visitors will walk with the deer and have many opportunities to feed them. But that isn’t all you will see. There are pygmy goats, antelope, miniature donkeys, buffalo, a potbellied pig, chickens, peacocks, cockatoo, reindeer, and llamas.
All of the animals are spread out on the ten-acre farm. The most popular animal is the 60 to 80 fallow deer, which make the farm their home. These deer will walk right up to you and start asking for a snack. You can feed them a cup of corn and pellets. Visitors will follow a path through the farm enjoying the many animals.

One of the best times to make your visit is during the months of May, June, and July. It is during this time of year that the fawns are being born. Or you might want to stop in during April to see the bucks shed their antlers.
Some of the unique animals need to be portioned off from the public for your protection. You will be able to see them behind fences. The Grand Canyon Deer Farm wants your visit to be a memorable one and your safety is a priority. There are some animals that don’t mingle well with people.

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At the end of your visit, you won’t want to miss the large gift shop. Here you will find every kind of animal souvenir for you to remember your visit.
The Grand Canyon Deer Farm has varying hours, depending on the time of year. During March, April and May it is open daily 9:00 to 6:00, during June, July and August it is open daily 8:00 to 7:00, during September and October it is open daily 9:00 to 6:00 and during November through February it is open 10:00 to 5:00. The farm is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas and if the weather is poor. The admission cost is $4.50 for seniors, $5.50 for adults, $3.25 for children 3 to 13 and those 2 and under are free. Group rates are available, however, advance reservations are requested. For more information, you may call 1-800-926-DEER or 520-635-4073.

The Grand Canyon Deer Farm has a large parking area to accommodate RV’s, semi-trucks, trailers, and buses.
You can get to the Grand Canyon Deer Farm from Williams by heading east out of town on Interstate 40 for 8 miles. Then take exit 171 at Deer Farm Road and follow the signs. If you are coming from Phoenix or Tucson take Interstate 10 north out of town up to Flagstaff. Once in Flagstaff take Interstate 40 west out of town. Then take exit 171 at Deer Farm Road and follow the signs. The farm is about 25 miles west of Flagstaff.
You will love this stop. The kids will remember it forever. The animals are tame and you will definitely get a terrific photo of these adorable deer.

Dogtown Lake
Dogtown Lake received its unique name, due to the expansive prairie dog town that once covered the open areas near the lake. Today, visitors will discover fewer prairie dogs than people at the lake. Dogtown Lake is a calm restful spot to visit. The lake is medium sized with trees rimming its edge.

Dogtown Lake is many activities to offer its visitors. There are 51 campsites available. Dogtown Lake Campground is open May 15 through October 31. The campsites have picnic tables and fire rings. There is a group site at Dogtown Lake. Pit toilets, a dump station and water faucets are located in the camping area. There are no utility hook ups. There is a 14-day stay limit. An $8.00 fee is charged per night, up to nine people. Group sites are $120.00 per night, up to 50 people. Tents, trailers and small motor homes are welcome. However, services are limited during the winter months. Campers will enjoy the nature trail winding around the area. Pets are permitted as long as they are restrained.

The lake has a small boat launch. Powerboats are limited to single electric motors of one horsepower or less. The lake is stocked with trout, crappies and channel catfish. A fishing license is required for anyone over the age of 14. There is no swimming in the lake.
The Dogtown Lake Trail gives visitors a pleasant path for a stroll around the lake. The trail also serves another purpose, to prevent damage to the lakeshore. The trail covers two miles and will take you less than an hour to travel. The Dogtown Lake Trail begins just west of the picnic area at the lake. The best time to make your visit is during the early spring or early winter.

You can get to Dogtown Lake from Williams by heading south on Fourth Street for approximately 3 and a half miles. Once you are at County Road 140 turn left and continue on for three miles. When you get to County Road 132 turn left and follow the road to Dogwood Lake. If you are coming from Phoenix or Tucson take Interstate 17 north out of town up to Flagstaff. Once you are in Flagstaff, take Interstate 40 west out of town to Williams. When you are in Williams take Fourth Street south for three and a half miles. Then take a left onto County Road 140 and continue for three miles. When you get to County Road 132 turn left and follow the road to Dogwood Lake. The roads to the lake are a combination of pavement and gravel. Some of these roads can be difficult to pass on during the winter. You will need to check conditions.

If you would like more information on this lake, you may call 520-635-4061.

Cataract Lake
Cataract Lake offers water lovers a little bit of everything. It has camping, picnicking, hiking, fishing, and boating.
The campground is open May 15 through October 31. There are 18 campsites that include picnic tables, garbage bins, and fire rings. Drinking water is available, but not during the winter months. Pit toilets are located nearby. No dump stations or utility hook ups are available at Cataract Lake. There is a 14-day stay limit. A fee of $8.00 is charged per vehicle per night, up to 9 people per site. Tents, trailers and small motor homes are welcome.
If boating is your interest, there is a cement boat launch ramp. The lake requires only boats with single electric motors or single gasoline engines of 8 horsepower or less.
Cataract Lake is stocked with rainbow trout, brown trout, and channel catfish. A fishing license is required for everyone over the age of 14. There is no swimming in the lake.
Cataract Lake is just four miles west of Williams. You can get to the lake from Williams by exiting north on Interstate 40 at exit 161 and head east on Golf Course Drive or Country Club Drive. If you are coming from Phoenix or Tucson take Interstate 17 north out of town up to Flagstaff. Once you are in Flagstaff, take Interstate 40 west out of town to Williams. Then take exit 161 north and head east on Golf Course Drive to the lake.
If you would like more information on this lake, you may call 520-635-4061.

White Horse Lake
White Horse Lake is a man made a lake, built in 1935. The lake has many things to offer those who love the outdoors. White Horse Lake is open May 15 through October 31. The lake has solar powered composting toilets, paved roads, and camp pads. There are no dumping stations available. The water is limited during the winter months. Pets are permitted, as long as they are restrained.

White Horse Lake is an extremely popular fishing lake. The lake requires only boats that have single electric motors or 1 horsepower or less. The lake is stocked with rainbow trout, brown trout, and channel catfish. A fishing license is required for those over the age of 14. There is no swimming in the lake.

You can get to White Horse Lake from Williams by taking Fourth Street south and traveling approximately nine miles. Then take a left down County Road 110 and travel for six miles. Then take another left onto County Road 109 and head three miles to the campground entrance. If you are coming from Phoenix or Tucson, take Interstate 17 north out of town to Flagstaff. Then take Interstate 40 west out of Flagstaff to Williams. Take exit 161 and head south into the town of Williams. After passing half way through town, you will come to Fourth Street. Turn right and head south on Fourth Street, traveling approximately nine miles. Then take a left down County Road 110 and travel for six miles. Then take another left onto County Road 109 and head three miles to the campground entrance.
If you would like more information on this lake, you may call 520-635-4061.
See Bill Williams Mountain Men
The Bill Williams Mountain Men were organized by a group of local Williams’s residence in 1953. The mountain men group began with only 14 members and has grown since. At first, the group the just wanted to get away from it all by embarking on a simple horseback outing. But as time passed, so did their goal. Today, they represent the spirit of Old Bill Williams and the trappers from long ago.
The Mountain Men relive the history of the early 1800’s by dressing and acting as scouts or guides from the wilderness of long ago. The group wears buckskins, just as the old scouts. They also wear fur hats, belts, and knives. By dressing the part, the group hopes to perpetuate the lore and memory of the mountain men.

Throughout the years since the group first organized, they have reached the ranks of Official Ambassadors for the State of Arizona. The group has traveled to Washington, D.C. several times for the presidential inaugural parade. Beginning in 1961, the Mountain Men rode in John F. Kennedy’s parade. They returned to Lyndon Johnson, Ronald Regan, and Bill Clinton.
Not only do the Mountain Men participate in presidential parades, they also do a yearly 200-mile journey
ey to Phoenix on horseback. Once in town, the group visits schools and hospitals talking about the rich history of the mountain man. The journey concludes with an appearance at a Phoenix rodeo. The Bill Williams Mountain Men have also been in the Fiesta Bowl Parade and the Rodeo of Rodeos Parade.
If you are in Williams over the Memorial Day weekend, you won’t want to miss the Rendezvous Days Weekend. This weekend began out of a tradition from the past. At one time, mountain men would gather after trapping season and rendezvous with the fur companies to negotiate their price on furs. During the weekend, visitors will see the Bill Williams Mountain Men whooping it up in a parade in downtown Williams.