Lake Mead is a long lake measuring 110 miles in length. The 550-mile shoreline encircles 157,900 acres of water. The deepest part of the lake is 500 feet. In 1964, the Lake Mead Recreational Area was established. This area not only includes the lake, but it also covers 1.5 million acres. This makes it twice the size of Rhode Island.

When you visit Lake Mead, you will see its geographical history in the rock formations. In Black Canyon, there are layers of granite-like rock dating back 1.8 million years ago. At Fortification Hill, there is lava flows that top it. These flows were formed 6 million years ago during the last Ice Age. Lake Mead is a spectacular sight to see.

Lake Mead is special, in that three of America’s four desert ecosystems are located there. The three ecosystems are the Mojave, the Great Basin, and the Sonoran Deserts. Since there are these ecosystems in the area, there are also a variety of plants and animals. Some of these plants and animals can be found nowhere else in the world.

There are numerous animals found in the Lake Mead Recreational Area. Some of the animals that you might see are coyotes, kit foxes, mule deer and bighorn sheep. Both the desert tortoise and the peregrine falcon are endangered species. These creatures live in the Lake Mead Recreational Area.

There are many recreational sites that rim the lake, along with picnic areas and sandy beaches. If you are interested in water sports this is the place to be. You will find free launching ramps and marinas to rent boats. Many people come to waterski, sail, houseboat, snorkel and jet ski.

The lake also has largemouth bass, crappie, and sunfish, for those who want to drop a line. The shoreline is a perfect place to make camp and enjoy your time fishing.

Temple Bar is a great spot on Lake Mead. There are several camping areas on the Arizona side of the lake. At Temple Bar, you will find 150 units for tent and trailer camping. If you want more information, call 928-767-3401. There is also RV camping at Temple Bar. For more information call, 928-767-3400. You can reach Temple Bar by taking State Route 93 north out of Kingman. When you get to Temple Bar Road on the right-hand side of State Route 93 turn and head north, until you dead end into Temple Bar.

Both Gregg’s Hideout and Pearce Ferry have camping areas for trailers and tents. If you want more information on either of these areas, you can call 928-564-2220. You can get to Gregg’s Hideout by taking State Route 93 north out of Kingman to Dolan Springs. At Dolan Springs turn right and head through the town of Dolan Springs. You will continue on Pearce Ferry Highway northeast to the turn for Gregg’s Hideout Road. Turn left and head north to Gregg’s Hideout. You can get to Pearce Ferry by heading out of Kingman north on State Route 93 to Dolan Springs. At Dolan Springs turn right and head through the town. You will continue on Pearce Ferry Highway, through Lake Mead City and on to the end at Pearce Ferry.

If you are interested in learning more about Lake Mead, you will have to venture across the border to Nevada, four miles east of Boulder City. Here you will discover the Alan Bible Visitor Center overlooking Lake Mead. The Center is filled with films and exhibits about the nature and history of the area. It is open daily 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. The Visitor Center is closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Admission is free. If you would like to know more about the Alan Bible Visitor Center, you may call 702-293-8990.

You will love your visit to this awesome lake. Every time I have gone, I have been amazed at the beauty of this gorgeous blue lake sitting amongst massive rock formations. The animals are there, you need to keep your eyes open.

Camping

Windy Point Campgrounds
Windy Point Campgrounds is a special spot just northwest of Kingman. It located in the Cerbat Mountains, just above the town of Chloride. The grounds are open May 1st through November 1st. There are only 7 tent or R.V. units available. Windy Point does provide vault toilets, picnic areas, and fire grills. The Campground does not have drinking water or showers. There is a $2.00 overnight fee.

You can get to Windy Point Campgrounds from Kingman by traveling north out of town on U.S. Highway 93, past Santa Claus and Chloride. Just after you pass Chloride, you will see the turnoff for Big Wash Road. Take the right turn off the U.S. Highway and continue down Big Wash Road to the very end of the road at Windy Point Campgrounds.
If you would like more information on this unique camping spot, just 31 miles north of Kingman, you may call 928-692-4400.

Wild Cow Springs Campgrounds
Wild Cow Springs Campgrounds is a beautiful area just southeast of Kingman. It located in the Hualapai Mountains, just past Hualapai Mountain Park. The grounds are open May 1st through November 1st. There are 24 tent or R.V. sites available. Wild Cow Springs does provide vault toilets, picnic areas, fire pits and fire grills. The Campground does not have water or showers. The grounds are handicap accessible. There is a $4.00 overnight fee.

You can get to Wild Cow Springs Campgrounds from Kingman by traveling east out of town on Hualapai Mountain Road. Once you get up into the mountains, you will pass the Ranger Station and Hualapai State Park. Then the road turns to dirt, but continue on to the Antelope Wash Road. Here you will turn left and head southwest to Wild Cow Springs Campgrounds.

If you would like more information on this mountain camping spot, just 19 miles southeast of Kingman, you may call 928-692-4400.

Packsaddle Campgrounds
Packsaddle Campgrounds is a neat spot just north of Kingman. The grounds are open May 1st through November 1st. There are only 4 tent units available. Packsaddle does provide vault toilets, a picnic area, and fire grills. The Campground does not have drinking water or showers. The real threat to this camping site is that there is no fee to camp and reservations are not necessary.

You can get to Packsaddle Campgrounds from Kingman by traveling north out of town on U.S. Highway 93, past Santa Claus and Chloride. Just after you pass Chloride, you will see the turnoff for Big Wash Road. Take the right turn off the U.S. Highway and continue down Big Wash Road to Packsaddle Campgrounds. If you would like more information on this unique camping spot in the Cerbat Mountains outside of Kingman, you may call 928-692-4400.

Burro Creek Recreational Site
Burro Creek Recreational Site is available year round. The campgrounds provide space for 25 tent or RV units. There are flush and vault toilets, but no showers. The Recreational Site also has drinking water, fire grills, and picnic areas. The grounds are handicap accessible. The overnight fee is $8.00 or you may use the Golden Age/Golden Access.

Reservations are not necessary for this Recreational Site. There is a 14-day limit. You can get to Burro Creek Recreational Site by way of Kingman or Wickenburg. From Kingman travel east out of town on Interstate 40, then head south on U.S. Highway 93. You will pass by the small town of Wikieup, continue south on U.S. Highway until you cross the Burro Creek Bridge. From here, you will travel one more mile until you see the sign for the Recreation Site. Take the turn off at the sign and go one and a half miles down the access road. If you are coming from Wickenburg, take U.S. Highway 40 north out of town. You will pass the very small town of Nothing. Just before you cross the Burro Creek Bridge, you will see the sign for the Recreational Site turn off. Take the turn and head down the access road for one and a half miles to the campgrounds. If you have questions about this site you may call 928-692-4400. The bridge is huge and the creek looks cool. You will enjoy your stay at this camping site.
Mohave County, at the time of its creation by Arizona’s first Territorial Assembly in 1864, actually included portions of present-day Nevada. In 1865, the northern portion of Mohave County was split off as Pah-Ute County. In addition, in 1867, parts of both countries –including the present site of Las Vegas – were attached to Nevada, which had become a state in 1864. The much-reduced Pah-Ute County was merged with Mohave County in 1871. Today, most of the historic sites of “Arizona’s Lost County” are covered by the waters of Lake Mead. The area that is now Mohave County began to attract settlers shortly after it was brought into the United States by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848. The 1860s saw an influx of miners after gold was discovered, and Mormons who were sent south from Utah by their church. Mohave County is geographically the second largest in the state. Most of it is classified as desert, but of its 13,479 square miles, 186 square miles is water. The county boasts 1,000miles of shoreline and is a great water sports center. It also has the longest stretch of historic Route 66. The Colorado River and both man-made lakes, Lake Mohave and Lake Havasu, play an important role in the growth of Lake Havasu City and Bullhead City. Kingman, the county seat, was not founded until the 1880s with the coming of the railroad. Before being moved to Kingman in 1887, the county seat had been in Mohave City, Hardyville, Cerbat, and Mineral Park – none of which exist today. Although these communities did not survive, the forces that led to their establishment – mining, the Colorado River, and the railroad– are still important to the county’s economy. Enterprise Zones serve Bullhead City, Colorado City, Kingman Industrial Park and the I-40 industrial corridor. The U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land management own 55.2 percent of the land; Indian Reservations, 6.7 percent; the state of Arizona, 6.6 percent; individual or corporate,17.2 percent; and other public lands, 14.3 percent.