When purchasing a home it is important to choose a home inspector who is well qualified, experienced, and will work with you.  In most cases, buying a home is the biggest financial transaction one will ever make.  A home inspection can prevent a lot of headaches that could come along with a property.

 

 

As a buyer, a home inspection gives you the opportunity to discover the true condition of the property.  A good inspector can save you from making a costly mistake or help give you the confidence in your decision to purchase the home. 

 

The inspector will let you know in advance what problems may arise so you can prepare for them.  Besides the general condition of the property, safety concerns will also be addressed in the inspection.  The home inspection can disclose potentially dangerous situations before it is too late.  Let’s face it; safety is the number one concern of most homebuyers.

 

When choosing a home inspector there are questions you will want to ask to pre-qualify him/her as your home inspector.  Is home inspecting a full or part time job?  How many home inspections have he/she completed the year before?  Does he/she carry errors-and-omissions insurance?  I don’t recommend working with inspectors, who don’t carry errors-and-omissions insurance.  Does he/she have any special qualifications?  Avoid inspectors who do home repairs, it could alter his/her judgment.  What will the inspection cover?  A good home inspection should include all of the property’s major mechanical and structural systems.

 

Be present at the time of the inspection, so you can see exactly what the inspector is referring to.  If a home inspector won’t work with you present, then choose another inspector.  Don’t be afraid to ask him/her questions.  If you don’t understand something in the report, then ask the inspector.  You hired the home inspector.

 

I believe home inspections are the most important part of the purchase transaction.  It allows for an impartial third party to tell you what is wrong with the property.  The prospective homebuyer becomes more aware of what he/she is purchasing.  It only makes sense to know as much about a property as possible before the close of escrow.